Donny's Ramblings

Failed Faith: Street Talk

6 Comments

This type of thing is right up my alley!

Jason Harper Writes:

We just posted a podcast called Failed Faith: Street Talk. Some are didn’t like it. In fact, some of the religious persuasion are upset that we recorded the conversation, much less, posted in online. I do not apologize.

Failed Faith is an honest assessment. Many people within faith have a stunted ability to accurately explain their belief without clouding it with the comforts of religious clichés. When asked how or why one should believe, those whom have a failed faith can’t give a reasonable or relevant explanation. They boast a shallow answer that uses circular reasoning, anecdote, and subjective theory. No depth that considers logic.

When asked, “Why is the Bible true?” they respond. They say, “Because the Bible says it’s true.” Failed Faith refuses to go beyond itself to explain itself. When that answer is deemed deficient, they get defensive and argumentative.

I’ve engaged them. Yes, those under the steeple of the church. I’ve asked them to explain in common language how or why an unchurched or pre-Christian should believe. They come back with less each time.

Failed Faith is recording that we made by capturing the essence of shallow speaking on the streets. We found people who wore their faith on their sleeve. We engaged them to kindly walk us through the process. When they used terms that a common citizen would not understand, we asked them to explain. We were not combative. We were not there to argue. We were just inquisitive.

Two final thoughts I’d like to share.

First, if you are a person of faith, I challenge you to become familiar with a working knowledge of what you believe, but WHY you believe it. Please check combative tones at the door. Please abandon judgmentalism. Please disregard dogma. Instead seek to listen. Seek to understand, before you seek to be understood.

Second, if you are person who has not prescribed to any faith, consider the claims of Christ. You may be like the hundreds of others I have encountered. They don’t have problem with Jesus, in fact they revere Him. You may, like me, just have a problem with some of those whom speak on his behalf.

Regardless, listen. Go to www.jasonharper.cc and click on the podcast headphones. Listen to Episode 134: Failed Faith Street Talk.

Until then, hope.

Jharp

Good stuff, Jason!

6 thoughts on “Failed Faith: Street Talk

  1. I imagine so – considering all that you’ve lived and experienced.

    Considering where you’re at now – how do you asnwer some of the questions that he has raised?

    On a side note – I don’t think it is circular nor equivacal to answer, “because the Bible says so,” to the question, “how do you know the Bible is true?” I think it is one of the weaker arguments for faith in the supernatural inspiration of the Bible, but it can be a powerful tool if used properly. The first thing to establish when confronted with this question is who is defining truth? Who’s truth? What is truth? Are all parties agreed upon the correspondent theory of truth ? Athiest or agnostic cannot demiss natrual arguments for the validity of the Bible as dogma. Unless they are willing to concede that their naturalistic arguments agianst the Bible are no no less dogmatic.

    I type all this because I want to point out that there are many assumptions and biases used by the author that “poison the well.” The obvious assumption is that Christianity is false because some of its devotees can’t adequately express their faith to his satisfaction. Despite his comments toward the end his assumption that Christianity is false because its adherents can’t cogently provide an answer still stands. That is a strawman, because even though I can’t explain it doesn’t make any less true.

    My question to him is he truly intelectually honest? Is he really interested in finding what is true?

    Michael
    http://www.the-confessions-of-a-porn-addict.blogspot.com

  2. I imagine so – considering all that you’ve lived and experienced.

    Considering where you’re at now – how do you asnwer some of the questions that he has raised?

    On a side note – I don’t think it is circular nor equivacal to answer, “because the Bible says so,” to the question, “how do you know the Bible is true?” I think it is one of the weaker arguments for faith in the supernatural inspiration of the Bible, but it can be a powerful tool if used properly. The first thing to establish when confronted with this question is who is defining truth? Who’s truth? What is truth? Are all parties agreed upon the correspondent theory of truth ? Athiest or agnostic cannot demiss natrual arguments for the validity of the Bible as dogma. Unless they are willing to concede that their naturalistic arguments agianst the Bible are no no less dogmatic.

    I type all this because I want to point out that there are many assumptions and biases used by the author that “poison the well.” The obvious assumption is that Christianity is false because some of its devotees can’t adequately express their faith to his satisfaction. Despite his comments toward the end his assumption that Christianity is false because its adherents can’t cogently provide an answer still stands. That is a strawman, because even though I can’t explain it doesn’t make any less true.

    My question to him is he truly intelectually honest? Is he really interested in finding what is true?

    Michael
    http://www.the-confessions-of-a-porn-addict.blogspot.com

  3. I think a lot about why I believe what I do, and how do I know it’s true. Last week when some Jehovah’s Witnesses came to my door, I had the opportunity to share my faith, and in sharing it I realized it REALLY HAS CHANGED my life. I am so far from perfect and never will be perfect in this life, but real Christianity does change a person from the inside and your whole perspective is different. But I think a lot about how Christianity would look to me if I wasn’t a Christian. That is why I think we have to be REAL. I like the way Rick McKinley expresses this in his book, THIS BEAUTIFUL MESS, which I am reading right now.
    Each person we encounter is so infinitely precious to God, and they need to see something genuine that gives hope and answers and practical help. Also Christians need to focus on what unites us and not what we disagree on! Where there are humans there will never be complete agreement on every detail. But I really do believe that Jesus is the Son of God who died for my sins, and that has done something to me on the inside that I can’t explain, but I want His love to show in my life in a way that can make a difference, even in some small way, to someone else.

  4. I think a lot about why I believe what I do, and how do I know it’s true. Last week when some Jehovah’s Witnesses came to my door, I had the opportunity to share my faith, and in sharing it I realized it REALLY HAS CHANGED my life. I am so far from perfect and never will be perfect in this life, but real Christianity does change a person from the inside and your whole perspective is different. But I think a lot about how Christianity would look to me if I wasn’t a Christian. That is why I think we have to be REAL. I like the way Rick McKinley expresses this in his book, THIS BEAUTIFUL MESS, which I am reading right now.
    Each person we encounter is so infinitely precious to God, and they need to see something genuine that gives hope and answers and practical help. Also Christians need to focus on what unites us and not what we disagree on! Where there are humans there will never be complete agreement on every detail. But I really do believe that Jesus is the Son of God who died for my sins, and that has done something to me on the inside that I can’t explain, but I want His love to show in my life in a way that can make a difference, even in some small way, to someone else.

  5. Hey Micheal,
    I am not searching for faith. You missed the point by a galaxy. Re-read it and consider that it is coming from the pulpit, not to the pulpit.

    I am an ordained pastor pastor on staff at the same church of 14 years.

    I fully grasp the value of intellectuality as well as honesty within the context of conscience.

    But thank you the for the posted response.

    Until then,

    jharp

  6. Hey Micheal,
    I am not searching for faith. You missed the point by a galaxy. Re-read it and consider that it is coming from the pulpit, not to the pulpit.

    I am an ordained pastor pastor on staff at the same church of 14 years.

    I fully grasp the value of intellectuality as well as honesty within the context of conscience.

    But thank you the for the posted response.

    Until then,

    jharp

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