Donny's Ramblings

Voting for Mercy: Why Proposition 2 is the Moral Choice

70 Comments

This is a guest blog post, written by Carrie Snider.  This is a very important issue and I, for one, am voting YES on Proposition 2 this November. I ask you to do the same.  Feel free to ask Carrie any questions that may come to mind.

After reading, please watch the videos below.

In my line of work, I see shocked faces all day long. As a professional farm animal protection advocate for the nonprofit Farm Sanctuary, working on the Yes on Prop 2 campaign, one of my primary responsibilities is to let others know the truth behind the meat, dairy and eggs they trust the agriculture industry to produce in safe, humane ways. When they hear the truth, shock, disbelief and regret are visible on their faces. Countless numbers of folks are learning for the very first time that the products they consume daily most likely come from facilities where farm animals are hardly considered sentient creatures. They are viewed and treated like cogs in a machine. So what are we, who commit ourselves to leading moral lives, to do with this bewildering information? On this blog alone, an average of 1,900 readers tune in daily to take in the thoughts of a man so committed to moral life that he turned down a lucrative and growing career to pursue a life of modesty. We are inspired by Donny’s commitment to doing the right thing, and we are inspired by the calls of the moral leaders around our world. What will we do for the animals? In this case, the answer is simple and free of cost:

Vote Yes on Prop 2 this November or, for those living outside California, ask the Californians you know to support this modest animal protection measure and consider donating to help spread the word.

Prop 2’s requests are simple:

-Allow egg-laying hens, breeding pigs and veal calves enough room to turn around

-Allow these animals the space to extend their limbs.

-Ban any confinement methods which categorically restrict these freedoms.

It is difficult to imagine a more modest proposition. In fact, you might be surprised to hear that these requirements are not already in place. But unfortunately, the situation is dire and in need of emergency repair. Twenty millionfarm animals are confined to cages for the vast majority of their lives in California alone. If that number is too large to grasp, consider that Los Angeles County (the largest county in the United States) has less than 11 million residents. With the staggering rate at which Americans are eating meat, we have created a situation in which farm animals vastly outnumber us, the consumers. And the effects are clear. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs), or Factory Farms, have become the rule in industrialized farming. In order to cram as many animals as possible into the smallest possible space, these animals are restricted to cages so small, they are unable to turn around, lie down comfortably and even extend their limbs fully.

Chickens—who make up the vast majority of the animals slaughtered in the US annually—are stuffed into battery cages, which are so small, that they are unable to even extend their wings. At Farm Sanctuary, we run two animal shelters for abused, neglected and abandoned farm animals. Indeed, I’ve seen the chickens from factory farms reach our shelter. They are bruised from head to foot; their feathers are gone, their crowns have fallen with their spirits, and sometimes—be still, my beating heart—they learn to walk as they timidly leave their cage for the first time. A bird never forgets she is a bird.

And chickens are not the only animals confined in this cruel and devastating way. Many Americans are now aware of the unconscionable conditions in which veal calves are raised. Prized for their white flesh, veal calves are denied the basic exercise and nutrition that would make their muscles strong, healthy… and pink. Without any thought to the mental and physical abuse caused by confinement, factory farm operators condemn these calves(less than 20 weeks old at the time of slaughter) to crates so restrictive, they cannot turn fully around. Their necks are routinely tethered to their crates, and they are allowed no social interaction.

In 2006, Arizona became the first US state to ban veal crates, and Colorado followed suit this year. If Prop2 passes this November, California—the largest agricultural state in the nation—will be the third to say no to this inhumane practice.

Finally, Prop2, if passed, would ban gestation crates—crates barely big enough to house a fully-grown pregnant pig for most of her life. Like the egg-laying hens and veal calves, breeding sows are not allowed the basic comforts of a clean and soft place to rest, a space big enough to turn around in, or a way to naturally interact with others. She is a unit of production and as such, is given no consideration as a living animal. Because breeding sows are kept in a virtually constant state of pregnancy, they will spend most of their lives in these tiny cages, waiting for slaughter.

The industrialized world brings with it endless opportunities. Technology now allows us to soothe our pains when we are sick, travel to places once too far to reach in a lifetime, and enjoy the music and books and blogs of people we have never met. But with these opportunities come even greater responsibility. For each dollar we spend, with each proposition we endorse, we vote for the world we would like to live in. It is time to ask ourselves: As moral people, as stewards of this delicate and unfathomably wonderful world, will we do the right thing for the animals who are left in our care? Will we learn about the issues affecting the most meek among us and pledge to take action on their behalf? Will we use our power, our democracy, and our voices for good? California, a state known for leading the nation in social justice issues, is now being watched with an unblinking eye. As moral citizens, we owe it to those around us to take a stand, to vote to end industrialized cruelty when we can.

Maya Angelou, the famed poet, Civil Rights activist, devout Christian, and committed animal protection advocate, once devoted the title of her most famous novel to the words of Paul Laurence Dunbar, who lamented the plight of the caged bird:

I know why the caged bird sings, ah me,

When his wing is bruised and his bosom sore

When he beats his bars and would be free;

It is not a carol of joy or glee,

But a prayer that he sends from his heart’s deep core

But a plea, that upward to Heaven, he flings–

I know why the caged bird sings.

Now is the time to answer the call of the caged bird, the caged sow, the caged calf and to allow these farm animals the most fundamental comfort. This November, we can all make a difference for 20 million animals. Please, vote YES on Prop 2. Tell your friends, coworkers and families about the measure, and educate yourself on farm animal issues. We are their guardians, their jail keepers, their saints. We choose between these options every time we purchase and every time we vote. May we choose well.

Carrie Snider is Farm Sanctuary’s Campaign Coordinator for Yes on Prop 2, as well as an Education Coordinator. Her favorite pig, Lily, jumped off a slaughter truck and saved her own life. Carrie lives in Los Angeles with her two amazing rescued dogs. For more information on Prop 2, visit www.yesonprop2.com.

VIDEOS RELATING TO PROP 2:

70 thoughts on “Voting for Mercy: Why Proposition 2 is the Moral Choice

  1. That all sounds nice and warm and fuzzy but I’m pretty skeptical as to what might be in the fine print that we haven’t heard about. I’m sure the bleeding hearts will vote for it. Personally, I think we need more politicians like Sarah Palin in office, people like her that walk the walk. That woman knows how to skin a moose. An organic free range moose that had limitless space in which to turn around in its whole life. Way better than a farm animal anyday, regardless of the farm conditions.

  2. That all sounds nice and warm and fuzzy but I’m pretty skeptical as to what might be in the fine print that we haven’t heard about. I’m sure the bleeding hearts will vote for it. Personally, I think we need more politicians like Sarah Palin in office, people like her that walk the walk. That woman knows how to skin a moose. An organic free range moose that had limitless space in which to turn around in its whole life. Way better than a farm animal anyday, regardless of the farm conditions.

  3. Hi Justin. You can read all the ‘fine print’ at http://www.yesonprop2.com . The proposition is very straightforward, and I’d be happy to answer any concerns you have. Thanks for reading!

  4. Hi Justin. You can read all the ‘fine print’ at http://www.yesonprop2.com . The proposition is very straightforward, and I’d be happy to answer any concerns you have. Thanks for reading!

  5. It absolutely has my vote!

  6. It absolutely has my vote!

  7. Yea! Thanks, Nancy!

  8. Yea! Thanks, Nancy!

  9. If I lived in California I would definitely vote YES on prop2
    This story was very depressing. The reality of these situations does need to be exposed but it is just so heartbreaking. If now that we know the truth and have the awareness and do nothing then we are pathetic.

    signed,
    bleeding heart. (at least I have one)

  10. If I lived in California I would definitely vote YES on prop2
    This story was very depressing. The reality of these situations does need to be exposed but it is just so heartbreaking. If now that we know the truth and have the awareness and do nothing then we are pathetic.

    signed,
    bleeding heart. (at least I have one)

  11. Hey Donny,
    Did you put a myspace bulletin out? I will post one on my pages….

    mt

  12. Hey Donny,
    Did you put a myspace bulletin out? I will post one on my pages….

    mt

  13. Kudos. I’m all for organic, free-range, and healthy. I live in a little town that doesn’t offer much choice in our selection of meat and eggs, which is unfortunate.

    There are a lot of things that happen in this world that seriously stink. I worry about the mistreatment of animals in this country, but I also worry about the mistreatment of human fetuses and our country’s apparent lack of morality on the issue of abortion. It surprises me most when women selfishly claim their right to choose to kill life within them, as if that really should be a woman’s right at all. To quote Carrie, “Will we learn about the issues affecting the most meek among us and pledge to take action on their behalf?” I really hope more of us continue to do so.

    Thanks for raising awareness. It’s a great thing to do. I especially like the first lines of your first paragraph. It’s true that lack of education often keeps us from speaking out against these issues. Keep spreading the truth!

  14. Kudos. I’m all for organic, free-range, and healthy. I live in a little town that doesn’t offer much choice in our selection of meat and eggs, which is unfortunate.

    There are a lot of things that happen in this world that seriously stink. I worry about the mistreatment of animals in this country, but I also worry about the mistreatment of human fetuses and our country’s apparent lack of morality on the issue of abortion. It surprises me most when women selfishly claim their right to choose to kill life within them, as if that really should be a woman’s right at all. To quote Carrie, “Will we learn about the issues affecting the most meek among us and pledge to take action on their behalf?” I really hope more of us continue to do so.

    Thanks for raising awareness. It’s a great thing to do. I especially like the first lines of your first paragraph. It’s true that lack of education often keeps us from speaking out against these issues. Keep spreading the truth!

  15. But veal is so good, why change anything?

  16. But veal is so good, why change anything?

  17. I agree with Celeste. It’s detestable that saving the whales and letting farm animals out of their cages gets more media attention than saving babies. That being said, if I lived in CA, I would absolutely vote for Prop 2. I’ve seen the differences between a dog that is free to move about and a dog confined to a leash. I would think farm animals would be healthier and happier (and…ummm…taste better…ehem…moving on) also.

    I do way too much eating out but when I DO buy eggs and such, I look for “free range” and “naturally raised”. Is that enough? Can I trust that the label is accurate and those birds were treated humanely? Is there any kind of federal standard that punnishes those companies who misuse the free range label?

    My favorite restaurant is Chipotle! It’s priced well, convenient, tastes fabulous AND humane! All of their chicken and pork is naturally raised and 50% of their beef is, with their eventual goal being 100% naturally raised. Know of any other national restaurant chains doing this?

  18. I agree with Celeste. It’s detestable that saving the whales and letting farm animals out of their cages gets more media attention than saving babies. That being said, if I lived in CA, I would absolutely vote for Prop 2. I’ve seen the differences between a dog that is free to move about and a dog confined to a leash. I would think farm animals would be healthier and happier (and…ummm…taste better…ehem…moving on) also.

    I do way too much eating out but when I DO buy eggs and such, I look for “free range” and “naturally raised”. Is that enough? Can I trust that the label is accurate and those birds were treated humanely? Is there any kind of federal standard that punnishes those companies who misuse the free range label?

    My favorite restaurant is Chipotle! It’s priced well, convenient, tastes fabulous AND humane! All of their chicken and pork is naturally raised and 50% of their beef is, with their eventual goal being 100% naturally raised. Know of any other national restaurant chains doing this?

  19. Hi, Kenni B!

    You can find information about the free range label here: http://www.cok.net/lit/freerange.php

    That website comes from a vegetarian standpoint, but the information should answer your questions. There currently aren’t federal standards for most of these labels, which is why legislation like Prop 2 is so imperative. Thanks for the support!

  20. Hi, Kenni B!

    You can find information about the free range label here: http://www.cok.net/lit/freerange.php

    That website comes from a vegetarian standpoint, but the information should answer your questions. There currently aren’t federal standards for most of these labels, which is why legislation like Prop 2 is so imperative. Thanks for the support!

  21. I’m interested in what you have to say and would like to subscribe to your newsletter

  22. I’m interested in what you have to say and would like to subscribe to your newsletter

  23. Chipotle has wonderful VEGGIE burritos, too!

  24. Chipotle has wonderful VEGGIE burritos, too!

  25. I live in CO, but if I were in Cali I would absolutely vote for this.
    You might have just made a vegeterian out of me as well Carrie.
    Val:)

  26. I live in CO, but if I were in Cali I would absolutely vote for this.
    You might have just made a vegeterian out of me as well Carrie.
    Val:)

  27. You’re lovely, Val. =)

    Everyone, be sure to catch Oprah today. It’s all about farm animals and how they are treated!

  28. You’re lovely, Val. =)

    Everyone, be sure to catch Oprah today. It’s all about farm animals and how they are treated!

  29. I’m definitely going to watch that! It starts in 21 minutes.

  30. I’m definitely going to watch that! It starts in 21 minutes.

  31. I will certainly vote yes on Prop 2!

  32. I will certainly vote yes on Prop 2!

  33. Growing up on a farm, I can see both sides of the coin here. Animals serve a purpose. They are our food. It is a fact that the vegan diet typically lacks many of the nutrients found in animal meat. I am not saying vegan is wrong, but nutritionally speaking it is not a good choice for most, especially women and young children. Even animals eat other animals. It is a fact of life…

    With that said, I have to say that the brain of these animals is pretty small and do you really think they have the emotional capability to feel sorry for themselves? While I do not necessarily agree with keeping these animals so confined that they cannot turn around, I also have to remind people of the financial consequences of such propositions. Either farmers & ranchers will have to reduce the number of animals they keep, thus reducing their income, or they will be forced to buy larger facilities. Both of which will increase the costs of our food.

    Here is my thought on the proper way to do it. Raise your own meat and grow a garden. Prevent the pesticides, hormones and unethical treatment of animals. Even city folk can participate in a farm co-op w/o having to live on enough acreage to raise animals. Support the Farmer’s markets and the back yard ranchers. Heck, support the local 4-H kids and buy their animals… Farming & Ranching doesn’t have to be commercialized, but people are so into the convenience of the grocery store they are willing to pay more and more for bad food. (bad because it’s injected with salt water, fed other animal by products, fed antibiotics and hormones etc.)

    So while I can see the moral issue you are posting about Donny, I don’t think that is the solution our country needs. We need to be teaching our children how to take care of themselves and part of that is through understanding where food comes from and how to raise it themselves. With the financial situation of our country, many folk are going to be forced to live off the land. It is a dying tradition in this country and that is a scary thing. Instead of teaching our kids how to apply for food stamps, let’s teach them how to provide for themselves….

    Ok, so I went a little off topic, but really it is all relevant and one proposition is not going to change much. I think the whole commercialized system we call agriculture is flawed right now and we just need to get back to basics!

  34. Growing up on a farm, I can see both sides of the coin here. Animals serve a purpose. They are our food. It is a fact that the vegan diet typically lacks many of the nutrients found in animal meat. I am not saying vegan is wrong, but nutritionally speaking it is not a good choice for most, especially women and young children. Even animals eat other animals. It is a fact of life…

    With that said, I have to say that the brain of these animals is pretty small and do you really think they have the emotional capability to feel sorry for themselves? While I do not necessarily agree with keeping these animals so confined that they cannot turn around, I also have to remind people of the financial consequences of such propositions. Either farmers & ranchers will have to reduce the number of animals they keep, thus reducing their income, or they will be forced to buy larger facilities. Both of which will increase the costs of our food.

    Here is my thought on the proper way to do it. Raise your own meat and grow a garden. Prevent the pesticides, hormones and unethical treatment of animals. Even city folk can participate in a farm co-op w/o having to live on enough acreage to raise animals. Support the Farmer’s markets and the back yard ranchers. Heck, support the local 4-H kids and buy their animals… Farming & Ranching doesn’t have to be commercialized, but people are so into the convenience of the grocery store they are willing to pay more and more for bad food. (bad because it’s injected with salt water, fed other animal by products, fed antibiotics and hormones etc.)

    So while I can see the moral issue you are posting about Donny, I don’t think that is the solution our country needs. We need to be teaching our children how to take care of themselves and part of that is through understanding where food comes from and how to raise it themselves. With the financial situation of our country, many folk are going to be forced to live off the land. It is a dying tradition in this country and that is a scary thing. Instead of teaching our kids how to apply for food stamps, let’s teach them how to provide for themselves….

    Ok, so I went a little off topic, but really it is all relevant and one proposition is not going to change much. I think the whole commercialized system we call agriculture is flawed right now and we just need to get back to basics!

  35. as long as you leave force feeding geese pounds of corn until their livers are about to explode alone, I’ll support it, gypsy

  36. as long as you leave force feeding geese pounds of corn until their livers are about to explode alone, I’ll support it, gypsy

  37. Don’t worry, Gypsy. Foie gras production is already in the phase out stage in California. It will be completely illegal to produce it here in 2012.

  38. Don’t worry, Gypsy. Foie gras production is already in the phase out stage in California. It will be completely illegal to produce it here in 2012.

  39. Hi Chantel

    While I don’t agree with you on the benefits and drawbacks of a vegan diet, that’s a discussion for another time. I think we can both agree that although it would be ideal for us all to farm our own food and know exactly how each product was produced, animal cruelty should never be acceptable in a civilized society. Voting YES on Prop 2 is simply a way to have the law match up with our moral convictions. Thanks for reading!

  40. Hi Chantel

    While I don’t agree with you on the benefits and drawbacks of a vegan diet, that’s a discussion for another time. I think we can both agree that although it would be ideal for us all to farm our own food and know exactly how each product was produced, animal cruelty should never be acceptable in a civilized society. Voting YES on Prop 2 is simply a way to have the law match up with our moral convictions. Thanks for reading!

  41. Hi, Dave C. You might be interested in http://www.farmsanctuary.org. There, you can sign up on the mailing list for the nation’s largest farm animal protection organization, and even join the activist network if you’d like. Thanks for caring about farm animals!

  42. Hi, Dave C. You might be interested in http://www.farmsanctuary.org. There, you can sign up on the mailing list for the nation’s largest farm animal protection organization, and even join the activist network if you’d like. Thanks for caring about farm animals!

  43. Hear hear, Nancy. Veggie burritos are delicious in every way. 😉

  44. Hear hear, Nancy. Veggie burritos are delicious in every way. 😉

  45. That reminds me..

    Know what the difference between a chicken and a pig?

    For a chicken it’s all in a days work.

    for a pig it’s a life long dedication.

  46. That reminds me..

    Know what the difference between a chicken and a pig?

    For a chicken it’s all in a days work.

    for a pig it’s a life long dedication.

  47. While I personally have neither the desire nor the intention to adopt a meatless diet, I hate to see any animal mistreated and would hope that animals raised for consumption would be properly cared for and treated with respect, if for no other reason than that they are God’s creatures and as such deserve our consideration.

    I have taken issue in the past with many stances of the “animal rights” community, who all too often seem not so much to love animals as they simply hate people, but in this particular instance, I see a piece of legislation to which no one but an unethical battery-farm operator should be able to object.

    In the days when many of our ancestors (such as my mother’s family) were farmers, people understood what it meant to properly care for their animals. Farms were happy places for humans and animals alike. There was a respect between farmer and flock, in which the farmer saw it as his duty to properly and compassionately tend to the needs of the animals which, in turn, provided a necessary service, whether by their egg, milk or wool production or by being humanely killed and dressed when the time arrived.

    That decency was discarded by big-business agricultural replacements that bastardized animal farming, turning what was once a noble profession into an inhumane fury to constantly produce more product with less investment. The results are things like battery cages, veal crates, and gestation crates.

    I think laws like this one are appropriate because they do not seek to eliminate the raising of animals for meat, but they do seek to provide at least a basic standard for how animals should be treated.

    While I can’t vote for this measure as I am not a California voter, you do have my best wishes for a victory at the polls.

  48. While I personally have neither the desire nor the intention to adopt a meatless diet, I hate to see any animal mistreated and would hope that animals raised for consumption would be properly cared for and treated with respect, if for no other reason than that they are God’s creatures and as such deserve our consideration.

    I have taken issue in the past with many stances of the “animal rights” community, who all too often seem not so much to love animals as they simply hate people, but in this particular instance, I see a piece of legislation to which no one but an unethical battery-farm operator should be able to object.

    In the days when many of our ancestors (such as my mother’s family) were farmers, people understood what it meant to properly care for their animals. Farms were happy places for humans and animals alike. There was a respect between farmer and flock, in which the farmer saw it as his duty to properly and compassionately tend to the needs of the animals which, in turn, provided a necessary service, whether by their egg, milk or wool production or by being humanely killed and dressed when the time arrived.

    That decency was discarded by big-business agricultural replacements that bastardized animal farming, turning what was once a noble profession into an inhumane fury to constantly produce more product with less investment. The results are things like battery cages, veal crates, and gestation crates.

    I think laws like this one are appropriate because they do not seek to eliminate the raising of animals for meat, but they do seek to provide at least a basic standard for how animals should be treated.

    While I can’t vote for this measure as I am not a California voter, you do have my best wishes for a victory at the polls.

  49. I don’t think this measure would affect small farms too much. Most of them already have decent conditions. It’s the big bastards that cram the livestock in small places.

  50. I don’t think this measure would affect small farms too much. Most of them already have decent conditions. It’s the big bastards that cram the livestock in small places.

  51. As an animal lover, Carrie’s description of inhumane treatment pains me. I can’t even watch the lobster tank at Red Lobster without feeling an ache in my heart. At the same time, for consistency’s sake, I wonder how Carrie and other supporters of Prop 2 feel about the born alive provisions of abortion laws. Would you require the humane treatment of an infant born alive as the result of a failed abortion? Are there limits on the value of life or on how far you extend compassion?

  52. As an animal lover, Carrie’s description of inhumane treatment pains me. I can’t even watch the lobster tank at Red Lobster without feeling an ache in my heart. At the same time, for consistency’s sake, I wonder how Carrie and other supporters of Prop 2 feel about the born alive provisions of abortion laws. Would you require the humane treatment of an infant born alive as the result of a failed abortion? Are there limits on the value of life or on how far you extend compassion?

  53. Rob and Dalen,

    You’re absolutely right. There is a HUGE difference between the way animals are treated on today’s modern factory farms, versus the smaller family farms. Many family farmers support this measure because they already comply with these standards for the sake of their animals and in response to the growing demand for more humanely raised animal products. While it’s foremost an issue of decency toward animals, it is also an issue of respecting those smaller business owners who are already reflecting the growing concerns of a public that cares about animals.

  54. Rob and Dalen,

    You’re absolutely right. There is a HUGE difference between the way animals are treated on today’s modern factory farms, versus the smaller family farms. Many family farmers support this measure because they already comply with these standards for the sake of their animals and in response to the growing demand for more humanely raised animal products. While it’s foremost an issue of decency toward animals, it is also an issue of respecting those smaller business owners who are already reflecting the growing concerns of a public that cares about animals.

  55. Hi Bill

    I don’t want to deviate from the topic too much here, but I’ll be happy to talk with you one-on-one about the cross-over issues in animal rights and the rights of the unborn. I know many activists who are devoutly committed to both. I would like to see everyone from all camps take an earnest look at the science and the ethics involved in both issues, and I take both matters very seriously. I hope you do too.

  56. Hi Bill

    I don’t want to deviate from the topic too much here, but I’ll be happy to talk with you one-on-one about the cross-over issues in animal rights and the rights of the unborn. I know many activists who are devoutly committed to both. I would like to see everyone from all camps take an earnest look at the science and the ethics involved in both issues, and I take both matters very seriously. I hope you do too.

  57. Perhaps Prop 2 is the moral choice. Unfortunately, as Californians we have been forced by arrogant activist judges to make a far more foundational moral choice.

    We need to vote Yes on Prop 8 in order to reclaim a definition of marriage that is moral, proper, and common sense. Failing in this would be the biggest threat we face as a society from the enemies of God. Serious moral and economical issues are at stake as well as the future of the church in being able to proclaim biblical truth even if it is not PC.

  58. Perhaps Prop 2 is the moral choice. Unfortunately, as Californians we have been forced by arrogant activist judges to make a far more foundational moral choice.

    We need to vote Yes on Prop 8 in order to reclaim a definition of marriage that is moral, proper, and common sense. Failing in this would be the biggest threat we face as a society from the enemies of God. Serious moral and economical issues are at stake as well as the future of the church in being able to proclaim biblical truth even if it is not PC.

  59. TES: Here, here!! Thanks for bringing this prop. up!

  60. TES: Here, here!! Thanks for bringing this prop. up!

  61. Here’s a Bible verse: “A righteous man regards the life of his animal, but the tender mercies of the wicked are cruel.” (Proverbs 12:10 New King James)

  62. Here’s a Bible verse: “A righteous man regards the life of his animal, but the tender mercies of the wicked are cruel.” (Proverbs 12:10 New King James)

  63. Right on, Sister! Great quote, Nancy.

  64. Right on, Sister! Great quote, Nancy.

  65. Hi TES

    It’s a good thing we get to vote on each and every proposition, rather than choosing between them. =) I hope you’ll vote on the side of mercy when you’re at the ballot box this November. Thanks!

  66. Hi TES

    It’s a good thing we get to vote on each and every proposition, rather than choosing between them. =) I hope you’ll vote on the side of mercy when you’re at the ballot box this November. Thanks!

  67. Carrie, I see you are against prop 8 because you love people. I understand your position on this if you believe homosexuality is natural. Rather than get into a discussion about that end that would go nowhere, I’d prefer asking if you think that it’s OK to force people to pull their kids out of public schools if they disagree morally with what would have to be taught from kindergarten. At first I personally didn’t care. I have friends that are gay. Although I believe it’s a perversion of what is natural, I don’t treat them any different. Check out this video to see what I’m talking about with the school thing.
    http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid1815825713

  68. Carrie, I see you are against prop 8 because you love people. I understand your position on this if you believe homosexuality is natural. Rather than get into a discussion about that end that would go nowhere, I’d prefer asking if you think that it’s OK to force people to pull their kids out of public schools if they disagree morally with what would have to be taught from kindergarten. At first I personally didn’t care. I have friends that are gay. Although I believe it’s a perversion of what is natural, I don’t treat them any different. Check out this video to see what I’m talking about with the school thing.
    http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid1815825713

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