Donny's Ramblings

Do Me a Favor and Buy American, Will Ya?

20 Comments

I’m no expert on much of anything, so what I’m about to write is nothing but opinion.

Am I the only one who thinks there are way too many people expressing hatred towards our country?  I’m not talking about the rest of the world… I’m referring to our own citizens.  Don’t those who complain realize that they are bad mouthing THEMSELVES? WE are the country.  You.  Me.  My family.  My friends.  If something is wrong, fingers shouldn’t be pointed anywhere other than back at ourselves.

Many examples could be used to illustrate the issue at hand, but I’ll write a few brief sentences about one in particular:  domestic auto manufacturers.

When I hear people saying that the auto dealers deserve to go down in flames of bankruptcy it turns my stomach.  WE made this happen.  You and me.

Here’s how I contributed: the last time I bought a car for myself, it was a brand new Honda Accord.  The last car Belinda and I bought together before we split up was a new Honda as well.

Buying foreign vehicles wasn’t always my modus operandi, as my prior vehicle purchases included two Ford Explorers, a Mustang Cobra, a brand new Ford Powerstroke Diesel Crew Cab 4×4, a Ford F150 Supercab 4×4, and a 3/4 ton Chevy Duramax Diesel.  As I witness our domestic automakers on the verge of going down in flames, I’m ashamed to have changed my pattern of buying American.  I really am.

I’ve seen people bitch and moan about the quality of domestic automobiles, but I can honestly tell you that I have never had major mechanical problems with any those vehicles I owned.

A bailout of the auto industry… I hate the idea, but I think it’s necessary to loan them the money they’re asking for.  If they go belly up, millions of people lose their jobs.  Not just the employees of the manufacturers and suppliers, but also those employed by auto dealers across the country, those employed by the shops patronized by those who lose their jobs, those patronized by those patronized by… you get the picture.

Here’s one narrow example to better paint the picture for you:
One of my clients is Corning Ford/Mercury/Dodge/Chrysler/Jeep.  As you can see, their line consists entirely of domestic vehicles.  If General Motors and Ford fail, not only do factory employees go out of business, but so do the more than 100 people employed by Corning Ford.  And since Corning is a very small town, I’d bet the local Starbucks would suffer.  Local realtors would suffer.  The local Taco Bell might be threatened as well.  The list goes on and on just in this tiny little town.  Can you see a little bigger picture as to why a loan (aka “bailout”) is important?

For the sake of disclosure let me state this:  I’d also be affected.  Most of my clients are domestic automobile dealerships. I’m confident in my ability to figure out another source of income, but I sure don’t want to have to test myself, know-what-I-mean?

Do me a favor… if you’re in the market for a car, please buy American.  And please encourage your friends/family to do the same.

20 thoughts on “Do Me a Favor and Buy American, Will Ya?

  1. buying american-made or fair-trade textiles is a very important step in combatting unfair labor conditions. American Apparel and No Sweat are two of my faves.

  2. buying american-made or fair-trade textiles is a very important step in combatting unfair labor conditions. American Apparel and No Sweat are two of my faves.

  3. First let me say I have always purchased vehicles from Ford until my last purchase which was a gmc. Generally this has been because I like trucks. However, I would like to point out that many vehicles from toyota and other foreign manufacturers are built right here in the usa by american workers. The quality of american vehicles vs foreign vehicles is identical. Personally I hope that the american manufacturers are forced into bankruptcy. They need to re-organize. For years they have over produced vehicles and over saturated their market which resulted in needing to reduce prices and offer subsidized financing to sell them. The reason they overproduced is that the unions had them strongarmed where they could not reduce capacity or production and their labor and legacy costs are out of control. I wish I could sit there and get 95% of my pay without needing to work like the union contract calls for. Now all of the car manufacturers are trying to say bk is not an option but its the only option to fix the problem long term. Look airlines filed and re-organized and people still flew on their planes. If someone will risk their life on a plane of an airline that is bankrupt they will buy a car from a company going through re-organization. Now as far as dealers go some will go out and some will stay. The reality is that chevy and ford have too many dealers. Toyota sells as many vehicles as chevy with 1/3 the number of dealers. There needs to be a reduction which will stop the deep discounting and allow people to make a better wage, surviving dealers to make a better profit, thus resulting in imporoved wages for the salesman, and service people and more money available for advertising etc.
    For many years the philosophy at the major american manufacturers was we will just sell more vehicles and outrun costs which has not happened and will not happen. They need to reduce their costs, reduce their duplicate car lines, brands and dealers, reduce their legacy costs and labor costs, create flexiblity in their work force to meet rises and falls in demands for their product etc. This only will happen if they re-organize. You cant loan billions to a company losing billions with no REALISTIC way to think they will be profitable soon.
    In addition if one did go out of business guess what the other manufacturers would sell more those jobs would move to those dealers and manufacturers as well as all the related industries. People arent going to stop buying cars just maybe from a different brand.
    Just like wal-mart came in yrs ago, before them it was gemco, target etc many of these companies replaced others that went out of business. I doubt anyone would say retail is going to die because mervyns and gotschalks are going under.

  4. First let me say I have always purchased vehicles from Ford until my last purchase which was a gmc. Generally this has been because I like trucks. However, I would like to point out that many vehicles from toyota and other foreign manufacturers are built right here in the usa by american workers. The quality of american vehicles vs foreign vehicles is identical. Personally I hope that the american manufacturers are forced into bankruptcy. They need to re-organize. For years they have over produced vehicles and over saturated their market which resulted in needing to reduce prices and offer subsidized financing to sell them. The reason they overproduced is that the unions had them strongarmed where they could not reduce capacity or production and their labor and legacy costs are out of control. I wish I could sit there and get 95% of my pay without needing to work like the union contract calls for. Now all of the car manufacturers are trying to say bk is not an option but its the only option to fix the problem long term. Look airlines filed and re-organized and people still flew on their planes. If someone will risk their life on a plane of an airline that is bankrupt they will buy a car from a company going through re-organization. Now as far as dealers go some will go out and some will stay. The reality is that chevy and ford have too many dealers. Toyota sells as many vehicles as chevy with 1/3 the number of dealers. There needs to be a reduction which will stop the deep discounting and allow people to make a better wage, surviving dealers to make a better profit, thus resulting in imporoved wages for the salesman, and service people and more money available for advertising etc.
    For many years the philosophy at the major american manufacturers was we will just sell more vehicles and outrun costs which has not happened and will not happen. They need to reduce their costs, reduce their duplicate car lines, brands and dealers, reduce their legacy costs and labor costs, create flexiblity in their work force to meet rises and falls in demands for their product etc. This only will happen if they re-organize. You cant loan billions to a company losing billions with no REALISTIC way to think they will be profitable soon.
    In addition if one did go out of business guess what the other manufacturers would sell more those jobs would move to those dealers and manufacturers as well as all the related industries. People arent going to stop buying cars just maybe from a different brand.
    Just like wal-mart came in yrs ago, before them it was gemco, target etc many of these companies replaced others that went out of business. I doubt anyone would say retail is going to die because mervyns and gotschalks are going under.

  5. It’s sickening to me the way it’s always considered more hip to criticize our government and president than it is to respect our country and appreciate the liberties that we have. I’m tired of political armchair quarterbacks too!

  6. It’s sickening to me the way it’s always considered more hip to criticize our government and president than it is to respect our country and appreciate the liberties that we have. I’m tired of political armchair quarterbacks too!

  7. Well I have a Honda Accord with over 240,000 miles on it- when it’s gone I’ll probably be riding an (American made) bike…….

  8. Well I have a Honda Accord with over 240,000 miles on it- when it’s gone I’ll probably be riding an (American made) bike…….

  9. DT hit it right on the head.

    It’s simply ridiculous that some folks in the US auto manufacturing business are getting paid $30-40 per hour to stand in one place and put bolts on a part of a car! I can tell you the people on the line at the Honda plants here in Ohio don’t make that much and they don’t need too. The unions are outdated, un-needed and suffocating the auto industry. The unions behind skilled tradesmen will be next.

    I work in the office of a trucking company that hauls parts for Honda. The Honda Accord is almost 100% American made. The only exceptions being a handful of parts shipped over from Japan. Japan does get the net profits but only after paying the salaries of millions of Americans. Including me.

    My current car is an Accord. The first NEW car I ever purchased. I love it! But I’ll probably buy American next time. I’d love to get another Mustang. My first two cars were Mustangs. Boy did I LOVE that 5.0 GT.

    I see, and in some ways, agree with what you’re saying Donny. But, like most things in life, it’s not always black and white.

  10. DT hit it right on the head.

    It’s simply ridiculous that some folks in the US auto manufacturing business are getting paid $30-40 per hour to stand in one place and put bolts on a part of a car! I can tell you the people on the line at the Honda plants here in Ohio don’t make that much and they don’t need too. The unions are outdated, un-needed and suffocating the auto industry. The unions behind skilled tradesmen will be next.

    I work in the office of a trucking company that hauls parts for Honda. The Honda Accord is almost 100% American made. The only exceptions being a handful of parts shipped over from Japan. Japan does get the net profits but only after paying the salaries of millions of Americans. Including me.

    My current car is an Accord. The first NEW car I ever purchased. I love it! But I’ll probably buy American next time. I’d love to get another Mustang. My first two cars were Mustangs. Boy did I LOVE that 5.0 GT.

    I see, and in some ways, agree with what you’re saying Donny. But, like most things in life, it’s not always black and white.

  11. I’ve always bought American. 1964 1/2 and 1969 Mustang, Ford Explorer, Ranger, F150 etc. Not now. I will again I’m sure, but the big 3 had the writing on the wall to develop more fuel efficient cars in the 80’s. Not only did they arrogantly ignore this, they made it impossible to compete with the Japanese by signing a crazy insane deal with the union to pay outrageous compensation. If a bailout is the only way to save them, then no way. I don’t want it. The fault is the big three and the union. We as consumers buy the best available for our money. That means foreign. I bought a Kia last week. Remember all the other American auto manufacturers? No? The big 3 have always sought to squeeze the new guy out. Now they sleep in the bed they made

  12. I’ve always bought American. 1964 1/2 and 1969 Mustang, Ford Explorer, Ranger, F150 etc. Not now. I will again I’m sure, but the big 3 had the writing on the wall to develop more fuel efficient cars in the 80’s. Not only did they arrogantly ignore this, they made it impossible to compete with the Japanese by signing a crazy insane deal with the union to pay outrageous compensation. If a bailout is the only way to save them, then no way. I don’t want it. The fault is the big three and the union. We as consumers buy the best available for our money. That means foreign. I bought a Kia last week. Remember all the other American auto manufacturers? No? The big 3 have always sought to squeeze the new guy out. Now they sleep in the bed they made

  13. Saw this on Fox News
    They can’t compete with foreign auto companies doing business in the U.S. and abroad.

    Each one of your companies has an issue that should tick every taxpaying soul off.

    Take a look:

    FORD:

    Mr. Mulally, you are asking for a $9 billion line of credit –”just in case”. You have testified under oath that you really don’t need the billions, but want it just in case one of the others goes belly up. That would help your business sell more cars, right? With all due respect, good bye. No money for you.

    CHRYSLER:

    A few years ago, Chrysler decided to get into bed with Cerebus Capital. The Cerebus folks thought they were buying Chrysler at a bargain price and therefore, they were going to make a killing by changing your management and business plan. Cerebus took Chrysler off the market so that they could get ALL the profits. They did not want to merely invest in Chrysler along side the rest of us, they wanted it all. Greed got the best of Cerebus and they bought a lemon.

    Sorry Cerebus and Mr. Nardelli, you wanted all the profits, now you get all the losses — no money for you!

    GENERAL MOTORS:

    All I can say about GM is that you, Mr. Wagoner, have been asleep at the wheel. You should have been selling or closing units to raise money long ago. There is no reason to hang on to Saturn, Pontiac, or Hummer. Keep on making Cadillac, Chevy and Buick (we hear Buick is popular and profitable throughout Asia). And what the heck took you so long to move on the Chevy Volt (hybrid/electric)? That car will unfortunately never see the light of day under the GM logo IMHO. Mr. Wagoner, you were slow to change and we don’t feel responsible for your errors in business judgment. No money for you, sorry.

    UNITED AUTO WORKERS UNION:

    Mr. Gettelfinger, you sir should be ashamed of yourself. I spend most of my day on TV talking about the demise of the U.S. auto industry. I am bombarded with e-mail messages and phone calls from Americans who are disgusted with the situation. Most don’t want to bail your business out with taxpayer money but everyone wants to know where ground zero is. I can only blame you, sir. Your union is the reason for the skew in cost per vehicle produced between Detroit’s Big Three and, say, a BMW built in America with American employees. Your “Legacy costs” burden Ford, GM and Chrysler so much that the following is true according to Standard & Poor’s:

    Profits per employee:

    Audi: $56,471 profit
    Toyota: $38,645 profit
    Honda: $29,840 profit
    BMW: $29,810 profit
    Nissan: $22,555 profit

    Ford: ($46,841) loss
    GM: ($90,444) loss

    It is your union, Mr. Gettelfinger that negotiated absurd items like job banks where idled workers literally play crossword puzzles and video games while receiving up to 95% of their pay and benefits. It was you, sir, who refused to grant the wish of every American watching your Capitol Hill testimony — a complete rewriting of your contracts with our auto industry. .

    I have the utmost compassion for the employees of Detroit’s Big Three. I HATE to see anyone out of work. It pains me to recommend that your group not get bailed out because there will be job cuts.

    My Promise:

    I PROMISE to purchase a vehicle from each of the Big Three automakers who agrees to undergo a Chapter 11 reorganization.

    I hope to buy a vehicle from a re-organized and re-patronized U.S. auto maker, one that is devoid of the shackles your union offers Detroit.

    My view is that, contrary to the pleas you have been making to the American people, we will, in fact, buy your cars, SUV’s and pick-ups even if you are in a structured bankruptcy.

    The public outpouring of sentiment to “buy American” will never be stronger. I will be a foot soldier in your battle to encourage our citizens to buy American cars and trucks from reorganized U.S. automakers not from a bailed out, unionized Detroit.

    Sincerely,

    Eric Bolling

  14. Saw this on Fox News
    They can’t compete with foreign auto companies doing business in the U.S. and abroad.

    Each one of your companies has an issue that should tick every taxpaying soul off.

    Take a look:

    FORD:

    Mr. Mulally, you are asking for a $9 billion line of credit –”just in case”. You have testified under oath that you really don’t need the billions, but want it just in case one of the others goes belly up. That would help your business sell more cars, right? With all due respect, good bye. No money for you.

    CHRYSLER:

    A few years ago, Chrysler decided to get into bed with Cerebus Capital. The Cerebus folks thought they were buying Chrysler at a bargain price and therefore, they were going to make a killing by changing your management and business plan. Cerebus took Chrysler off the market so that they could get ALL the profits. They did not want to merely invest in Chrysler along side the rest of us, they wanted it all. Greed got the best of Cerebus and they bought a lemon.

    Sorry Cerebus and Mr. Nardelli, you wanted all the profits, now you get all the losses — no money for you!

    GENERAL MOTORS:

    All I can say about GM is that you, Mr. Wagoner, have been asleep at the wheel. You should have been selling or closing units to raise money long ago. There is no reason to hang on to Saturn, Pontiac, or Hummer. Keep on making Cadillac, Chevy and Buick (we hear Buick is popular and profitable throughout Asia). And what the heck took you so long to move on the Chevy Volt (hybrid/electric)? That car will unfortunately never see the light of day under the GM logo IMHO. Mr. Wagoner, you were slow to change and we don’t feel responsible for your errors in business judgment. No money for you, sorry.

    UNITED AUTO WORKERS UNION:

    Mr. Gettelfinger, you sir should be ashamed of yourself. I spend most of my day on TV talking about the demise of the U.S. auto industry. I am bombarded with e-mail messages and phone calls from Americans who are disgusted with the situation. Most don’t want to bail your business out with taxpayer money but everyone wants to know where ground zero is. I can only blame you, sir. Your union is the reason for the skew in cost per vehicle produced between Detroit’s Big Three and, say, a BMW built in America with American employees. Your “Legacy costs” burden Ford, GM and Chrysler so much that the following is true according to Standard & Poor’s:

    Profits per employee:

    Audi: $56,471 profit
    Toyota: $38,645 profit
    Honda: $29,840 profit
    BMW: $29,810 profit
    Nissan: $22,555 profit

    Ford: ($46,841) loss
    GM: ($90,444) loss

    It is your union, Mr. Gettelfinger that negotiated absurd items like job banks where idled workers literally play crossword puzzles and video games while receiving up to 95% of their pay and benefits. It was you, sir, who refused to grant the wish of every American watching your Capitol Hill testimony — a complete rewriting of your contracts with our auto industry. .

    I have the utmost compassion for the employees of Detroit’s Big Three. I HATE to see anyone out of work. It pains me to recommend that your group not get bailed out because there will be job cuts.

    My Promise:

    I PROMISE to purchase a vehicle from each of the Big Three automakers who agrees to undergo a Chapter 11 reorganization.

    I hope to buy a vehicle from a re-organized and re-patronized U.S. auto maker, one that is devoid of the shackles your union offers Detroit.

    My view is that, contrary to the pleas you have been making to the American people, we will, in fact, buy your cars, SUV’s and pick-ups even if you are in a structured bankruptcy.

    The public outpouring of sentiment to “buy American” will never be stronger. I will be a foot soldier in your battle to encourage our citizens to buy American cars and trucks from reorganized U.S. automakers not from a bailed out, unionized Detroit.

    Sincerely,

    Eric Bolling

  15. First, many “foreign” cars are made in the US using primarily American-made parts. Honda is the largest employer in central Ohio. They’re a winning company. Do we want to hold on to jobs in a failing company or allow a more successful business model to grow into the losers’ turf? A more successful business pays taxes because they make profit, they can pay off their debt, get a return to shareholders, and provide employees a stable environment. It’s always tempting to support poor business models and poorly-run companies to avoid a short-term loss. That’s because the loss is vivid while a long-term gain (even far grater) that is forsaken is easier to miss.

    Trade doesn’t really work in terms of political borders anyway. Winnipeg, Canada, is just as far a drive from Minneapolis as Chicago is. Why should I buy something made in Honolulu over something made in Canada? Some political borders are really pointless in this sense. I get not buying from Myanmar because of the slave labor or other areas for political concern. Even there, are the people really better off if the way they pay for their food is cut off?

    Some of the best “welfare” in the world is to allow people to work. Buying something made in a poorer nation (from the perspective of the US, that means almost every other nation) helps provide a living for poorer people.

    This is an oversimplistic example, but it explains one of the largest forces driving trade. When I bought a Prius (“American” manufacturers weren’t in the market for smaller more fuel-efficient cars because they had too much overhead per vehicle) that was made in Japan, most of the money I paid for it went “to Japan” where most of the value-added was (it paid the workers, engineers, etc.). Now, Toyota has a bunch of American dollars. Where do they use that? Only in America. They could exchange currencies around all day long, those dollars will have to be spent in the US. If not, it means someone just gave me something of value in exchange for a slip of paper. What a deal! Unfortunately, they don’t do that. They bring it back here in investment or otherwise (not necessarily as Toyota because they might exchange it for yens, but that person or whoever else farther down the line who traded the yens or other currencies for the dollars will “spend” it in the US). If the foreign holder of the money wishes to simply hold on to my former American dollars and just collect a bunch of them, it causes currency fluctuations. It causes the dollar to decline against their currency (“they” have a bunch of dollars and not a lot of yen with nothing else to compensate, the dollars depreciate with respect to the yen because there are just so many dollars and less to do with them or there are so few yen and so much to do with them). This situation makes the dollar cheaper and makes American goods less expensive to holders of yen (primarily Japanese people). This makes it more difficult for Japanese companies to compete against American companies. Remember the roller-coaster ride of gas prices? If you look at crude oil, a fungible commodity (a gallon of crude is a gallon or crude is a… it doesn’t intrinsically change much value every day, but currencies do), you’ll notice that it went up when the dollar slid and came back down when the dollar went back up. The media fixated on “high gas prices” instead of reporting on the “low dollar” and the benefits to exporting industries that this situation created.

    Another way to think of it is like this. If the US had two separate currencies, one for west of the Mississippi and one for east of the same river, what difference would it make? The currencies would fluctuate as the regions are distinct in many ways even under the same currency. A trade wall would make both sides worse off (though California steel would do better without competition from the eastern states, California’s tech giants would eat a loss — there is no net gain in this situation). If the US owned Baja California, would it suddenly become okay to buy a car that was made from there?

    I believe this country is the greatest on earth, but I’ve learned that Canadians, Mexicans, and other people are just as human as Americans; America is a special place, but Americans are not special. The death of a Chinese person is just as tragic as the death of an American. “We” may disagree with “their” governments or policies, but, at the end of the day in most places on this planet, it’s mostly the workers and their dependents who benefit from trade. This is especially the case for the poorest people on earth (not to be confused with the poorest people in the US).

    This only scratches the surface and I understand if it doesn’t initially make any sense. There are a number of issues this touches that can’t be adequately addressed in a web posting, but I hope this little bit helps.

  16. First, many “foreign” cars are made in the US using primarily American-made parts. Honda is the largest employer in central Ohio. They’re a winning company. Do we want to hold on to jobs in a failing company or allow a more successful business model to grow into the losers’ turf? A more successful business pays taxes because they make profit, they can pay off their debt, get a return to shareholders, and provide employees a stable environment. It’s always tempting to support poor business models and poorly-run companies to avoid a short-term loss. That’s because the loss is vivid while a long-term gain (even far grater) that is forsaken is easier to miss.

    Trade doesn’t really work in terms of political borders anyway. Winnipeg, Canada, is just as far a drive from Minneapolis as Chicago is. Why should I buy something made in Honolulu over something made in Canada? Some political borders are really pointless in this sense. I get not buying from Myanmar because of the slave labor or other areas for political concern. Even there, are the people really better off if the way they pay for their food is cut off?

    Some of the best “welfare” in the world is to allow people to work. Buying something made in a poorer nation (from the perspective of the US, that means almost every other nation) helps provide a living for poorer people.

    This is an oversimplistic example, but it explains one of the largest forces driving trade. When I bought a Prius (“American” manufacturers weren’t in the market for smaller more fuel-efficient cars because they had too much overhead per vehicle) that was made in Japan, most of the money I paid for it went “to Japan” where most of the value-added was (it paid the workers, engineers, etc.). Now, Toyota has a bunch of American dollars. Where do they use that? Only in America. They could exchange currencies around all day long, those dollars will have to be spent in the US. If not, it means someone just gave me something of value in exchange for a slip of paper. What a deal! Unfortunately, they don’t do that. They bring it back here in investment or otherwise (not necessarily as Toyota because they might exchange it for yens, but that person or whoever else farther down the line who traded the yens or other currencies for the dollars will “spend” it in the US). If the foreign holder of the money wishes to simply hold on to my former American dollars and just collect a bunch of them, it causes currency fluctuations. It causes the dollar to decline against their currency (“they” have a bunch of dollars and not a lot of yen with nothing else to compensate, the dollars depreciate with respect to the yen because there are just so many dollars and less to do with them or there are so few yen and so much to do with them). This situation makes the dollar cheaper and makes American goods less expensive to holders of yen (primarily Japanese people). This makes it more difficult for Japanese companies to compete against American companies. Remember the roller-coaster ride of gas prices? If you look at crude oil, a fungible commodity (a gallon of crude is a gallon or crude is a… it doesn’t intrinsically change much value every day, but currencies do), you’ll notice that it went up when the dollar slid and came back down when the dollar went back up. The media fixated on “high gas prices” instead of reporting on the “low dollar” and the benefits to exporting industries that this situation created.

    Another way to think of it is like this. If the US had two separate currencies, one for west of the Mississippi and one for east of the same river, what difference would it make? The currencies would fluctuate as the regions are distinct in many ways even under the same currency. A trade wall would make both sides worse off (though California steel would do better without competition from the eastern states, California’s tech giants would eat a loss — there is no net gain in this situation). If the US owned Baja California, would it suddenly become okay to buy a car that was made from there?

    I believe this country is the greatest on earth, but I’ve learned that Canadians, Mexicans, and other people are just as human as Americans; America is a special place, but Americans are not special. The death of a Chinese person is just as tragic as the death of an American. “We” may disagree with “their” governments or policies, but, at the end of the day in most places on this planet, it’s mostly the workers and their dependents who benefit from trade. This is especially the case for the poorest people on earth (not to be confused with the poorest people in the US).

    This only scratches the surface and I understand if it doesn’t initially make any sense. There are a number of issues this touches that can’t be adequately addressed in a web posting, but I hope this little bit helps.

  17. As far as vehicles go I have always bought american. But for everthing else its harbor freight and wal mart. When industry and business starts paying me like a american I will start buying american.

  18. As far as vehicles go I have always bought american. But for everthing else its harbor freight and wal mart. When industry and business starts paying me like a american I will start buying american.

  19. Here’s the problem with ‘By American’: we export. What if all the Japanese ‘Bought Japanese,’ and all the Mexicans ‘Bought Mexican’? Our economy would collapse. Buy the best car for the best price and don’t feel bad about that. If the products are equivalent, then pull out your patriotism. Anything else is charity, or more cynically put, welfare. Perhaps Detroit would have reformed and been in better shape if they didn’t have the ‘Buy American’ crowd who give them a guaranteed percentage of the market regardless of quality or price.

  20. Here’s the problem with ‘By American’: we export. What if all the Japanese ‘Bought Japanese,’ and all the Mexicans ‘Bought Mexican’? Our economy would collapse. Buy the best car for the best price and don’t feel bad about that. If the products are equivalent, then pull out your patriotism. Anything else is charity, or more cynically put, welfare. Perhaps Detroit would have reformed and been in better shape if they didn’t have the ‘Buy American’ crowd who give them a guaranteed percentage of the market regardless of quality or price.

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